60+ (or elderly years)

Keep learning

Learn

Did you know reading is one of the oldest ways to train your brain. By reading one chapter a night of your favourite book it can help moderate sleep by producing melatonin to help you drift off into a relaxing sleep. Take a look at what your local library has on offer as there are often community events and training available as well as a variety of options for home library services.

Warwickshire libraries

Coventry libraries

Connect

Connect

Community forums can help you to develop lasting friendships and can get you interested in hobbies and activities that you’ve thought about taking up. DIY, fishing, rambling, salsa classes and antiques are just a few of the topics that you will find online. You don’t need to be an expert in any of these fields, most of the users on the forum will be more than happy to induct you into their favourite pastime.

Age UK - activities and events

Give

Give

We can sometimes be so wrapped up and busy in life that we do not give ourselves time to make those little appointments that we keep meaning to. Free screening assessments that are available to you during this age category include bowel cancer screen (age 60+) and for men 65+ AAA screening (Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm).

Be active

Be active

Regardless of your fitness level, it’s never too late to get moving and get some sort of daily exercise into your life. This doesn’t have to be a workout routine, but a 30-minute walk, housework or even a few strengthening exercises, anything that helps raise your heartbeat and help improve your mobility, balance and prevent falls.

NHS - sitting exercises

Take notice

Take notice

Taking notice of your diet as you get older is vital to maintain good health. Water is the single most important fluid you should drink throughout the day. It quenches thirst as well as having a multitude of other benefits, which include increased concentration levels, lubrication for the joints and helps maintains blood pressure. The recommended amount is 2 to 3 litres (around 7 to 8 glasses of water) each day. People quite often reduce fluid intake because of bladder problems however, older people are at increased risk of dehydration and therefore if this is something that affects you make an appointment to see your GP.